Wednesday, 23 June 2010

All Square

Now fully Amended.

Robert gave me a nudge and reminded me that Harrison also printed booklets and stamps with the round tab. (see comments). These have now been added to the lists below.

NB: Robert mentioned ( Type IA) after consulting one of the specialist catalogues, this as you will see has now been updated along with other information. Thanks Robert for your help and observations.


Where does the word "window booklets" come from? It seems an eternity ago now, but does anyone remember the year 1987?

I was looking through a part collection of (actual) window booklets when this nostalgic feeling for 1987 came over me. My I am old aren't I?

This was a time when a first class stamp cost just 18p and booklet windows were actually open (or to put it correctly they had a see through window in order to view contents). This window was located on the booklet front cover.


The first issues of these particular booklets were printed by Harrison & Sons and had a square locking tab, this was later changed to a round locking tab (type II). More about type II later.

What interested collectors most with these booklets, was as well as the see through window, the fact that each booklet had different letter codes incorporated into the wording of the cover design gave us more varieties to collect. This letter can be found at the bottom of the cover near the fold.

The image shown above is that of a cover which contained 10 x18 p Machins with code letter "C" (square tab). This was also available with a code letter "D".

For you convenience a full list of the square and round tab window booklets is produced below.

Type 1

4 x 13p 52p with the two different codes "E" and "F".
4 x 18p 72p with the two different codes "A" and "B".
4 x 26p £1.04 with two different codes : "I" and "J".
10 x 13p £1.30 with two different codes - "G" and "H".
10 x 18p £1.80 with two different codes - "C" and "D".

Type 1A (as above with round locking tabs)

4 x 13p 52p with the two different codes "E" and "F".
4 x 18p 72p with the two different codes "A" and "B".
4 x 26p £1.04 with one code : "I" , "J" does not exist.
10 x 13p £1.30 with two different codes - "G" and "H".
10 x 18p £1.80 with two different codes - "C" and "D".


Type II , stamps and booklets printed by Harrison (round tabs)

4 x 14p 56p with two different codes - "O" and "P"
4 x 19p 76p with two different codes - "K" and "L".
4 x 27p £1.08 with two different codes - "S" and "T".
10 x 14p £1.40 with two different codes - "Q" and "R".
10 x 19p £1.90 with two different codes - "M" and "N".

Type II (Round Tabs) the stamps were printed by Harrison and the covers were printed by Walsall security printers.

4 x 14p 56p with two different codes "O" and "P".
4 x 19p 76p with two different codes - "K" and "L".

To make things a little more difficult Type II were also printed by Questa, the 10 x 14p booklet from the inside cover with round tab and the booklet codes are shown and listed below.









10 x 14p 1.40 with two different codes - "Q" and "R".
10 x 19p £1.90 with two different codes - "M" and "N".

These booklets alone make up a nice mini collection, and are still sold by dealers at a reasonable price. I estimate a full collection without error booklets will cost in the region of £220 -£250. If you wish to add to the collection, look for missing phosphors, low OBA and panes with translucent paper.

They were also issued with cylinder numbers, some of these cylinder booklets are quite scarce and hold good catalogue prices.

Questa booklets: No cylinder booklets are known but they are known with 2 types of perforations /torn or cut panes, also some cut panes have blind holes in the perforations.

2 comments:

Robert said...

A few shortcuts in your account here. The original Harrison books (A - J) were also reissued with round tabs (Type 1a) but book J does not exist. Harrison also printed Type 2 covers with their own stamps inside; there were also books of 4 x 27p worldwide postcard rate stamps (S & T).

Machin Man said...

Thanks Robert,

I guess my head is not full of useless information after all, it is half empty:-)