Saturday, 29 October 2011

Franking And Forgeries






What on earth is going on with Royal Mail? They spend a fortune on new security measures, overprints, codes, security slits and still the mail does not receive a cancel on a 40 - 50 % percentage the mail I receive here in Spain.




Perhaps it is because of the addition of the new self adhesive gum which is also a new security feature, after all said and done I ask myself they are difficult to remove from the envelopes (so RM think).




Take a look for your self all these shown above and below, they have actually been canceled with a wavy line and to are clearly forgeries. How come I ask myself, have these which have no phosphor bars been allowed to pass though the system?

These shown are just a small selection, I see several more Machin forgeries on eBay which have been delivered. In hindsight these should have been automatically rejected by ALF where as the genuine stamps should be canceled!!!



Judging by the price they fetch £1 or so there must be loads , perhaps hundreds and hundreds that get though the postal system. It Makes a mockery out of all that has been done by Royal Mail and the money spent. But then again looking at a brighter picture it gives collectors something else that is actually philatelic to look out for.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

Serious collectors should avoid ebay auctions for such material, although the stamps are not created for the philatelic market the trading in them prepetuates the crime.

GBStamps said...

Much of the UK mail that I receive here in the US is uncanceled, especially large envelopes, although this is nothing new.

If Royal Mail is now intentionally not canceling the new self-adhesives, does that mean they should be considered pre-canceled stamps?

--Larry

Anonymous said...

The situation is similar here in Florida. The last kilo lot I got to play with had lots of NVIs, both blue and gold with the "ma10" secret marks and there is a very high percentage of skips apparent.
And while the stamps with "security" cuts are harder to detach from the paper, it is neither especially difficult nor, with increasing expertise, excessively time consuming.
Charlie
Lecanto, Florida